lef

Decolonial Introduction to African Philosophy

Fernando Proto Gutiérrez

MA´AT AS A COSMOGONIC AND ETHICAL PRINCIPLE

The pan-African philosopher Cheikh Anta Diop postulated in “The african origin of civilization: myth or reality?” (1974), the fact that the beginning of African culture may be Kemet (Km.t), (that was the original name of “Egypt”), because of its cosmogonic structure –manifiested, for example, in the Dogon pantheon- or because of its social organization structure, from which it is posible to draw a significant historical link with the Mandingo Empire: “This heralded the launching of the Mandingo Empire (capital: Mali) of which Delafosse would write: Nevertheless, this little village of the Upper Niger was for several years the principal capital of the largest empire ever known in Black Africa, and one of the most important ever to exist in the universe (…) Listing this chronology, we have simply wanted to show that there was no interruption in African history. It is evident that, if starting from Nubia and Egypt, we had followed a continental geographical direction, such as Nubia-Gulf of Benin, Nubia-Congo, Nubia-Mozambique, the course of African history would still have appeared to be uninterrupted”. In this sense, African unity refers to sedimentation processes related to an analogical temporal sequence, evident by the superlative manifestation in the different languages, of an expression that reveals the continent’s historical, cultural and psychological fraternity: it is “Ma’at”.
In accordance with the works of N. Reich, Anta Diop certifies the relation of a linguistic identity by means of the study of Nubia and Central African roots, as Miss Homburger did in Chapter XII of “Les langues négro-africaines”. Nonetheless, it was Théophile Obenga -continuer of the work of Diop-, who investigated Ma’at’s immanence as a proper philosophical category in the different african cultures:

Ancient Egyptian: maat, ‘‘truth’’; maa, ‘‘true’’
Coptic (Egypt): me, mee, mie, mei, meei, ‘‘truth’’ ‘‘justice’’ and also ‘‘truthful’’ ‘‘righteous’’ Caffino (Cushitic, Ethiopia): moyo, ‘‘motive’’ ‘‘reason’’ (truth and reason are inseparable)
Kongo (Congo): moyo, ‘‘life’’ ‘‘soul’’ ‘‘mind’’ (same semantic field)
Ngbaka (Central African Republic): ma, magic medicine (in order to know the truth)
Fang (Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and South Cameroon): mye, mie, ‘‘pure’’ (tabe mye, ‘‘to be physically morally pure’’)
Mpongwe (Gabon): mya, ‘‘to know’’ the truth (mya re isome, the ‘‘selfknowledge’’ which the Delphic oracle also enjoined: gnothi seauton)
Yoruba (Nigeria): mo, ‘‘to know’’ the truth (knowledge)
Hausa (Nigeria): ma, ‘‘in fact’’ ‘‘indeed’’ (affirmative truth: ni ma na ji, ‘‘I in fact heard it’’)
Mada (North Cameroon): mat, ‘‘genie’’ ‘‘goblin’’ (semantic specialization)
Nuer (Nilotic, Sudan): mat, ‘‘total’’ ‘‘sum up’’; ‘‘forces’’ (ro mat, ‘‘to join forces with’’ Maat is indeed the total of all virtues, all forces as ideals to guide man in his personal and spiritual life) .

Ma’at is thus constituted in the ontological proto-structure or condition of possibility for the relational, ethical and alterative reciprocity of the “Ubuntu” as a way of “being-in-the-world” of the African people. According to Bleeker, Tobin and Lichtheim, Ma’at is the foundational idea of religion in Ancient Egypt which, despite its polysemous character, can be translated as “justice”, “truth” and “righteousness”, as it was done by W.W. Budge in his interpretation of the “Egyptian Book of Dead”.
For its part, Mubabinge Bilolo describes Ma’at in its philosophical aspect, through a tripartite articulation, as: a. An ideal of knowledge directed to love towards science b. A moral ideal of truth, justice and rectitude and c. A metaphysical ideal of love and knowledge of “the being”, which indicates the origin of all the things in the world.
In this sense, Ma’at places the horizon of African philosophy within the framework of understanding the ethics as a metaphysics of reality and alterity, while the truth of being, knowing and doing is presented as co-originating in the ordering of the world, as far as moral rectitude is concerned. Hence,Ma’at can be known as Logos or just “proportion of the cosmos”, linking the stability of the world order to the moral quality of human acts: good practice leads humans to the truth, as well as being ordained to the righteousness of Ma’at co-implies preserving the world, symbolized this by Osiris in his struggle against Seth/Typhon.
In “The Maxims of Ptahhotep”, written in hieratic -that forms part of the moral or sapiential literature of Ancient Egypt-, it is read (37.10-37-14): “A perfect word is hidden more deeply than precious stones. It is to be found near the servants working at the mill-stone”. Practicing the Ma’at required to be fair in dealing with others (Ubuntu), in accordance with a social stratification system in which everybody could access to the Truth-Justice: after dying, the human´s heart had to be justified; it was led by Anubis, the pen Of Ma’at, to the “Room of the Two Truths”; Then, if the deceased’s heart proved to be just, then it deserved eternity in the osiric fields of Ialu.
Thus Ma’at’s practice verifies a metaphysics of reality and alterity by which Necessity-Justice (Ma´at), in other words, the worldly and human order, share the same destiny: either destruction or conservation. For, in the words of the egiptyan moralist Onchsheshonqy: “May life always happen after death”.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BILOLO, M., Le createur et la creation dans la pensée memphite et amarnienne. Kinshasa, Libreville-Munich, Publications Universitaires Africaines, 1988
Blecker, C.J, Egyptian Festivals. Leiden, EJ. Brill, 1967
GLANVILLE, S., The instructions of Onchsheshonqy, en: Catalogue of Demotic Papyri in the British Museum, II (Londres, 1955). COL, 10, 25.
NKOGO ONDÓ, E., Síntesis sistemática de la filosofía africana, Barcelona, Ediciones Carena, 2001
OBENGA, T., A companion to African philosophy. Egypt: Ancient History of African Philosophy, Malden, Blackwell Publishing, 2004

INTRODUCCIÓN A LA FILOSOFÍA AFRICANA
MA´AT COMO PRINCIPIO COSMOGÓNICO Y ÉTICO

El filósofo panafricanista Cheikh Anta Diop postuló en The african origin of civilization: myth or reality? (1974) la generatriz filogenética/memética de la cultura africana, cuya directriz habría de ser Kemet (Km.t), ya en lo que respecta a su estructura cosmogónica -análoga, por ejemplo, al panteón Dogón -, o en lo que se refiere a la estructura de organización social, trazando así también un significativo vínculo histórico con el Imperio Mandingo: “This heralded the launching of the Mandingo Empire (capital: Mali) of which Delafosse would write: Nevertheless, this little village of the Upper Niger was for several years the principal capital of the largest empire ever known in Black Africa, and one of the most important ever to exist in the universe (…) In listing this chronology, we have simply wanted to show that there was no interruption in African history. It is evident that, if starting from Nubia and Egypt, we had followed a continental geographical direction, such as Nubia-Gulf of Benin, Nubia-Congo, Nubia-Mozambique, the course of African history would still have appeared to be uninterrupted” . La unidad africana se remite a los procesos de sedimentación de una misma secuenciación temporal, evidente por la manifestación superlativa, en las distintas lenguas, de una expresión que revela la fraternidad histórica, cultural y psicológica del continente (C. Anta Diop), a saber: Ma´at. En conformidad con los trabajos de N. Reich, Anta Diop certifica la relación de identidad lingüística por medio del estudio de raíces centroafricanas y de Nubia, del mismo modo que lo hiciera luego Miss Homburger en el capítulo XII de Les langues négro-africaines. No obstante, es Théophile Obenga -continuador de la obra de Diop-, quien investiga, con la especificidad del caso, la inmanencia de Ma´at como categoría filosófica propia de los distintos grupos étnicos en África:

Ancient Egyptian: maat, ‘‘truth’’; maa, ‘‘true’’
Coptic (Egypt): me, mee, mie, mei, meei, ‘‘truth,’’ ‘‘justice,’’ and also ‘‘truthful,’’ ‘‘righteous’’ Caffino (Cushitic, Ethiopia): moyo, ‘‘motive,’’ ‘‘reason’’ (truth and reason are inseparable)
Kongo (Congo): moyo, ‘‘life,’’ ‘‘soul,’’ ‘‘mind’’ (same semantic field)
Ngbaka (Central African Republic): ma, magic medicine (in order to know the truth)
Fang (Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and South Cameroon): mye, mie, ‘‘pure’’ (tabe mye, ‘‘to be physically morally pure’’)
Mpongwe (Gabon): mya, ‘‘to know’’ the truth (mya re isome, the ‘‘selfknowledge,’’ which the Delphic oracle also enjoined: gnothi seauton)
Yoruba (Nigeria): mo, ‘‘to know’’ the truth (knowledge)
Hausa (Nigeria): ma, ‘‘in fact,’’ ‘‘indeed’’ (affirmative truth: ni ma na ji, ‘‘I in fact heard it’’)
Mada (North Cameroon): mat, ‘‘genie,’’ ‘‘goblin’’ (semantic specialization)
Nuer (Nilotic, Sudan): mat, ‘‘total,’’ ‘‘sum up’’; ‘‘forces’’ (ro mat, ‘‘to join forces with.’’ Maat is indeed the total of all virtues, all forces as ideals to guide man in his personal and spiritual life) .

Ma´at se constituye, de esta suerte, en la proto-estructura ontológica o condición de posibilidad para la reciprocidad relacional, ética y alterativa del Ubuntu como modo de estar-en-el-mundo del hombre africano. De acuerdo a Bleeker , Tobin y Lichtheim , Ma´at es la idea fundacional de la religión en el Antiguo Egipto que, pese a su carácter polisémico, puede traducirse como “justicia”, “verdad” y “rectitud”, tal como lo hace W. W. Budge en su interpretación del Libro de los Muertos.
Por su parte, Mubabinge Bilolo describe a Ma´at en su aspecto filosófico, a través de una articulación tripartita, como: a. Ideal del conocimiento direccionado al amor hacia la ciencia b. Ideal moral de verdad, justicia y rectitud y c. Ideal metafísico de amor y conocimiento del ser (Hpr), que señala el origen de todo ser.
En este sentido, Ma´at sitúa al horizonte de la filosofía africana en el marco de comprensión de la ética como una metafísica de la realidad y de la alteridad, en tanto la verdad del ser, del conocer y del hacer se presenta como co-originaria al ordenamiento del mundo, tanto en lo que se refiere a la rectitud moral. De aquí que Ma´at sea logos o proporción justa del cosmos (en la tradición pitagórica que aprenden Parménides y Heráclito) que vincula la estabilidad del orden mundanal (Bajo y Alto Egipto), a la cualidad moral de los actos humanos: practicar el bien conduce a la verdad, o lo que es lo mismo, ordenarse a la rectitud de Ma´at co-implica conservar el mundo, simbolizado por Osiris en su lucha contra Seth/Tifón.
En las Instrucciones de Ptah-Hotep a su hijo (S. XXIV a.C), escrito en hierático que forma parte de la literatura moral o sapiencial del Antiguo Egipto, se lee (37.10-37-14): “No te vanaglories de tu conocimiento. Toma consejo tanto del ignorante como del sabio, pues, no se alcanzan los límites del arte y ningún artista posee la perfección total. Una bella palabra está más escondida que la esmeralda, pero la puedes hallar escondida en las manos de la sirvienta que trabaja con las piedras de moler”. Practicar la Ma´at requería ser justo en el trato-con los otros, en conformidad con un sistema de estratificación que no era privativo en lo que respecta al acceso a la Verdad-Justicia. Pues, la estructura de organización social había de ser legitimada por un régimen moral fundado en el vínculo entre inteligencia, verdad y rectitud, esto es, en el corazón, que tras la muerte debía ser justificado -una vez el difunto fuera conducido por Anubis-, al sopesarse contra la pluma de Ma´at, en la “Sala de las dos Verdades”; luego, si el corazón del difunto resultaba ser justo, entonces éste merecía la eternidad en los campos osiríacos de Ialu.
Es así que la práctica de Ma´at verifica una metafísica de la realidad y de la alteridad por la cual la Necesidad-Justicia, a decir verdad, el orden mundanal y humano, comparten un mismo destino: o la destrucción o la conservación. Pues, en palabras del moralista Onchsheshonqy: “Ojalá la vida suceda siempre a la muerte” , y ello tanto para Kemet, como para los hombres.

BIBLIOGRAFÍA

BILOLO, M., Le createur et la creation dans la pensée memphite et amarnienne. Kinshasa, Libreville-Munich, Publications Universitaires Africaines, 1988
Blecker, C.J, Egyptian Festivals. Leiden, EJ. Brill, 1967
GLANVILLE, S., The instructions of Onchsheshonqy, en: Catalogue of Demotic Papyri in the British Museum, II (Londres, 1955). COL, 10, 25.
NKOGO ONDÓ, E., Síntesis sistemática de la filosofía africana, Barcelona, Ediciones Carena, 2001
OBENGA, T., A companion to African philosophy. Egypt: Ancient History of African Philosophy, Malden, Blackwell Publishing, 2004

Fernando Proto Gutierrez nació en Buenos Aires. Es Profesor-Licenciado en Filosofía por la Universidad del Salvador (USAL), 2009. Maestrando en el Programa de Bioética de la Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO), bajo la Dirección del Dr. Ricardo Pobierzym, en el área de la Bioética Profunda. Postítulo en Epidemiología Integral y Aplicada a la Gestión Sanitaria por la Universidad CAECE y Universidad Tecnológica Nacional, 2017. Experto Universitario en Implementación de Proyectos E-Learning por la Universidad Tecnológica Nacional y NetLearning (Certificado en Cátedra UNESCO-CUED). Es Docente-Investigador de Introducción al Pensamiento Científico, Metodología de la Investigación en Cs. de la Salud y Taller de Elaboración de Trabajo Final I y II en el Dpto. de Cs. De la Salud de la Universidad Nacional de La Matanza (UNLaM) y Director General del Programa Internacional de Investigación en Filosofía Intercultural de la Liberación FAIA | Filosofía Afro-Indo-Americana (ISSN 2250-6810).

2534total visits.